Great Review For A New Spot In The Richmond District

Chronicle Restaurant Critic and Editor at Large Michael Bauer just gave Pearl, a new restaurant in the Richmond District, a wonderful review. The longtime food critic says the best neighborhood restaurants become the beacon that gives the neighborhood its identity, and with its good food, comfortable surroundings, and service that is understated but efficient, Pearl is a shining example.

The writer explains that it took years, but Jack Murphy, who made Pizzetta 211 a destination pizza restaurant in the Outer Richmond, has expanded. Murphy’s new restaurant, Pearl, is the type of refined neighborhood place that used to open nearly weekly in San Francisco and enriched the dining scene. But that has recently been lost in the guise of quick-casual spots, fixed price menus, and upscale destination restaurants.

In another rare move, according to the review, Murphy turned his back on outside investors. Instead he brought in eight employees who all work in the restaurant and collectively came up with the concept and design.

To learn more about the restaurant and its menu, please read the Bauer review in its entirety, or visit Pearl’s website.

Pearl
5 PM to 10 PM nightly. Closed on Mondays. Weekday mornings from 7:30 AM until 2 PM. Bagels until they run out. Weekend brunch service from 10 AM to 2 PM.
6101 California Street

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Candytopia: Museum, Funhouse, Or Simply A Fantasyland?

Whatever it is, it opened last Thursday, and it is something to behold. Described on its website as a “sprawling sanctuary of confectionary bliss,” the experiential museum debuted in New York and Los Angeles before arriving in San Francisco.

Like the the Museum of Ice Cream, it’s perfect for whimsical exploration, and instagram. Hoodline explains that Candytopia features seven rooms, one of the most notable being its art gallery. There, some of pop culture’s most recognizable faces — Snoop Dogg, Cardi B, and Prince among them — are comprised entirely of jelly beans, gummy bears, red vines, rock candy, sprinkles and jawbreakers.

In other rooms, guests will have the opportunity to be blasted by rainbow confetti that shoots out of a pig’s rear, or take a dip in the much-buzzed-about Marshmallow Pit.

Whatever it is, it might be worth checking out. Tickets are available now through the end of November.

Candytopia
767 Market St. (at 4th Street)

How Apps Are Changing The Way We Tip In San Francisco

Great article on SFGate.com over the weekend on the changing culture of tipping in the City. Writer Filipa Ioannou puts it this way:

“The white iPads at the register at coffee shops, food trucks and bakeries across San Francisco now feel like a part of a standard procedure. Order your food or drink. Get your card swiped. Then, someone swivels around a screen and you’re often faced with a choice of a tip — 15, 18 or 20 percent? 18, 20 or 25 percent?”

We’ve seen these iPads, and so have you. Do you feel coerced, tip-shamed, or offended by this new technology and practice? Or do you find it a convenience?

So much disruption going on in every facet of our daily lives. This is just another example of how technology is impacting even the most innocent and unassuming aspects — like paying for that decaf, soy latte with an extra shot and cream you love so much.

To learn more about the technology and how it’s being received, please click here.

SF Restaurants Doubling As Co-Working Spaces By Day

SF.Eater.com has spotted an interesting trend that’s taking place, and it makes so much sense we’re surprised that this hasn’t come up before. It actually began in New York. A startup called Spacious invites restaurants to open during the day — not to serve food, but to simply provide a comfortable setting and WiFi for remote workers and freelancers.

Spacious expanded its subscription-based membership model to San Francisco last fall, and it’s been growing steadily since, recently unveiling its latest restaurant partner, Barcino. Other SF Spacious partners are the Elite Cafe, Finn Town, Buffalo Theory, and the Press Club.

For remote workers and freelancers, a Spacious subscription is $129 a month (or $99 per month with an annual plan) — a better deal than WeWork, whose cheapest hot desk option is $220 a month.

For restaurants that often operate on razor-thin margins and have the extra space, it seems to make sense to do this, as long as it doesn’t interfere with prepping for dinner service of course.

SF Women Have Children Later Than Anywhere Else In U.S.

SFGate.com published an interesting story yesterday, explaining why San Francisco women have children later in life than anywhere else in the nation.

Women in San Francisco County become first-time mothers, on average, at age 31.9. If they’re married, that number rises to 32.4, and if they’ve got a college degree, it increases to 32.9. Manhattan mothers trail closely behind in the age ranking, as do those in Marin County.

The average age of first-time mothers in the U.S. is 26, and for fathers it’s 31. Those numbers have increased with the decades. In 1972, women typically gave birth at age 21.

Why are San Francisco women giving birth later than others? The answer, though complex, largely boils down to education. Women without college degrees give birth an average of seven years earlier than those with degrees. According to SFGate.com, there are other factors as well as you might expect. Child care costs and the high price of real estate can become a barrier to starting a family in San Francisco and in many other parts of the Bay Area.

When you think about this, none of it is surprising. It’s just interesting to see the actual numbers, and to learn about our ranking in comparison to the rest of the country. To read the entire piece, please click here.

A Compelling Case For Eliminating Parking Spaces?

We never thought that the day would come when we would say that eliminating parking spaces in the City makes sense, but writer Kevin Frazier makes a pretty compelling case for it in the most recent issue of the Marina Times.

He focuses on the Marina, and presents a lot of astonishing numbers that may in fact suggest that parking spaces might become a thing of the past, at least in that neighborhood.

Here are some excerpts:

“Marina residents — increasingly less reliant on cars for transportation — may soon not need a place to park a car (assuming they even own one). In 2011, 51.6 percent of Marina residents drove to work (44.2 percent drove alone, the rest carpooled). With the proliferation of ride sharing, scooter-grabbing, and public transit awareness, just under 41 percent of workers used a car to get to work in 2016 (33 percent drove alone). In the same year, 35 percent of the city’s workers drove alone and 7.2 percent carpooled, bringing the total to 42.2 percent citywide.”

“Other Marina workers simply forgo commuting at all. The percentage of people working from home climbed from 9.8 percent of workers to 10.8 percent from 2015 to 2016. What’s more, economists generally forecast that working from home will become available to more workers as video-chatting and file-sharing expands into new sectors.”

“Another shift in demand for parking: tourists opting to ride-share, scoot, or cycle instead of renting a car. Lime and other multimodal transit companies have quickly discovered tourists’ travel preferences and moved them away from rental cars. Hertz and others have closed hundreds of shops in recent years in response to tourists finding new options more affordable and efficient. Accordingly, the city has seen a significant increase in the supply of alternate modes of transportation that don’t require conventional parking places.”

“A final factor threatening the prevalence of parking spots: the majority of Marina residents don’t own a car. Less than 30 percent of San Francisco households in 2016 owned a car, a 4 percent decline from the year before. Car-less households may soon tire of effectively subsidizing parking and the negative externalities it creates. Consider that surface parking spots cost $5,000 to $10,000 to construct; even more staggering, structured parking spots tally to $25,000 to $50,000 per spot.”

Pretty compelling, right? To read the entire piece, please click here.

Foodie Tuesday: Robot-Made Burgers in San Francisco

At Creator, a new restaurant in SoMa, high-tech robots are now making  $6 hamburgers.

It’s the culmination of years of research aided by some of the region’s best and brightest minds who have worked at the likes of Tesla, NASA, Walt Disney Imagineering and Chez Panisse. It’s not like these robots are driving cars, but still this is pretty impressive!

Do you think this might go over well in San Francisco? You bet it will. The place just opened and there’s already a wait-list to get in. We’re not talking hours. We’re talking weeks and months. As of now, you need to buy pre-paid tickets to visit Creator — but there are none available. According to its website, tickets are sold out for June and July, and there is a wait-list for August.

Never-the-less, we’re told it’s worth the wait so be persistent! Watch the video to learn more.

Creator 680 Folsom Street, near Third Street, San Francisco creator.rest