A Guide to San Francisco’s Best Public Art Installations

SF.Curbed.com just updated and published a wonderful guide to San Francisco’s best public art installations. It includes an interactive map, making it easy to locate all of these pieces.

On this list you’ll find everything from statues made of trees and earth in the Presidio to a kinetic sculpture in the Tenderloin that moves with the wind and lights up at night.

Here are a number of our favorites:

  • Skygate 1574-1636 The Embarcadero
  • Nuotatori 661 Lombard Street
  • Earth Wall 50 Moraga Avenue
  • Fountain at Gateway Court 430 Davis Court
  • The Thinker 100 34th Avenue
  • Untitled (Three Dancing Figures) 747 Howard Street
  • Willie McCovey Statue 24 Willie Mays Plaza
  • Caruso’s Dream 55 9th Street
  • SQUARED Fell St & Octavia Boulevard
To see the entire list, along with photos, descriptions, and the interactive map, please click here.
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Spend A Night In The Presidio, In Luxury Or In A Tent

Enjoy an overnight stay in the Presidio. The park is currently home to two hotels, the Inn at the Presidio, and the recently opened Lodge at the Presidio. You can also enjoy a national park camping experience at Rob Hill, the Presidio’s group campground.​​​

You absolutely need to make reservations well in advance, and accommodations aren’t inexpensive. Even camping will cost you $125 per site per night. But the views and the experiences are priceless. Picture yourself, for example, sitting at an outdoor fire pit with a view of the Golden Gate Bridge in the near distance.

See the ABC 7  video report below to learn more about the amenities at the Lodge of the Presidio.

Weekend Events and the Weekly Real Estate Update

SF.FunCheap.com has published a great online guide to San Francisco’s best Bastille Day celebrations taking place Saturday. Enjoy all things French — food, music, wine , beer, and more at a variety of venues. Meanwhile the SF Anime & Cosplay Festival is happening from 11 AM to 4 PM in Japantown Peace Plaza. And on Sunday you can watch the World Cup Final, France vs. Croatia, on a big outdoor screen with thousands of others at Civic Center Plaza. It promises to be a spirited and fun event!


On the “Homes for Sale in San Francisco” front, here’s our report for this week, 7/8/18 – 7/14/18

A California and Bay Area Real Estate Market Report

We will soon be releasing our 2018 Second Quarter Report, but in the meantime we thought we would share information provided by the California Association of Realtors, based on May 2018 real estate sales. A continued shortage of homes for sale pushed California’s median home sales price to a new record for the first time since the previous housing boom, with the Bay Area recording double-digit percent annual growth for the 11th straight month.

According to the report, the median sales price for a single-family home in the state was $600,860 in May, up 9.2 percent year-over-year for the highest annual rate of appreciation in four years. California’s median price surpassed its previous peak of $594,530, recorded 11 years ago.

“As we predicted last month, California’s statewide median home price broke the previous pre-recession peak set in May 2007 and hit another high as tight supply conditions continued to pour fuel on the price appreciation fire,” CAR Senior Vice President and Chief Economist Leslie Appleton-Young said in a statement accompanying the report. “With inventory starting to show signs of improvement, however, home price appreciation could decelerate in the second half of the year, especially since further rate increases are expected to hamper homebuyers’ affordability and limit how much they are willing to pay for their new home.”

The median sales price for a single-family home in the nine-county Bay Area climbed to $1,088,000, up by 16.4 percent from May 2017, marking the second straight month the region hit a new peak. More specifically, all five of the state’s million-dollar counties are in the Bay Area: San Francisco ($1,620,000). San Mateo ($1,600,000), Marin ($1,415,000), Santa Clara ($1,400,000), and Alameda ($1,025,000).

Foodie Tuesday: Robot-Made Burgers in San Francisco

At Creator, a new restaurant in SoMa, high-tech robots are now making  $6 hamburgers.

It’s the culmination of years of research aided by some of the region’s best and brightest minds who have worked at the likes of Tesla, NASA, Walt Disney Imagineering and Chez Panisse. It’s not like these robots are driving cars, but still this is pretty impressive!

Do you think this might go over well in San Francisco? You bet it will. The place just opened and there’s already a wait-list to get in. We’re not talking hours. We’re talking weeks and months. As of now, you need to buy pre-paid tickets to visit Creator — but there are none available. According to its website, tickets are sold out for June and July, and there is a wait-list for August.

Never-the-less, we’re told it’s worth the wait so be persistent! Watch the video to learn more.

Creator 680 Folsom Street, near Third Street, San Francisco creator.rest

How Many of San Francisco’s 19 Sister Cities Can You Name?

The City recently installed a large, multi-pronged signpost near the Powell Street Station in Union Square, featuring the names of all of San Francisco’s sister cities and pointing in the direction of each, along with the distance away in miles.

The art installation was the brainchild of Mayor Mark Farrell, whose office credits it as a celebration of “person-to-person diplomacy.”

According to the City, a Sister City relationship is a broad-based, officially approved, long-term partnership between two communities in two countries. Sister City relationships in the United States began under President Eisenhower as a means to foster peace and prosperity by creating bonds between people from different cities around the globe.

These relationships bring people of different cultures together to celebrate and appreciate their differences and create cultural, educational, informational, and trade exchanges through person-to-person “citizen diplomacy.”

In case you are curious, here are our 19 Sister Cities:

The Bay Area’s Most Beautiful Hikes

Summer is here, and it’s time to get outside and do some hiking. Thrilllist.com published a guide to the most beautiful hikes in the Bay Area, including some valuable information on each trail. All are within easy reach of San Francisco, and one is in the City itself.

Here are their picks:

To see the entire piece, along with links and trail descriptions, please click here.

Should You Move to SF?

“Should You Move to SF?” When we saw this headline for a column on SF. Curbed.com, we held our breath and read the piece with trepidation.  It’s easy to be negative, and to take shots online. We see that all the time. And these days, San Francisco can be a big target — we certainly have our share of challenges. But we found the post by Brock Keeling and

They begin by looking at the City as a whole, and then get into specifics.

The first thing you should know: SF is expensive. Second thing you should know: It’s small. These two factors will play major roles in your decision and life here, should you choose to accept it.

If you’re coming from a small town, San Francisco will feel larger than life, and overwhelming. On the other hand, if you’re coming from a large metropolis such as New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles, or even Philadelphia, SF will seem small. With a conservative amount of space — the city measures 46.87 square miles — you might be surprised to find that, for a city considered the capital of technology, it’s somewhat provincial.

San Francisco is filled with extremes and contradictions, ranging from the microclimates to the economy.

All very true. Here are just some of the specifics they go on to address, explore, and explain:

  • Picking a neighborhood you like is important.
  • If possible, live in SF without a car.
  • Not everyone works in/talks about tech.
  • Political beliefs are really strong.
  • You’ll be spoiled with outdoor space.

To read the entire feature, please click here.